Post Reply 
 
Freshness Rating:
  • 7 Votes - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
How to Properly Paragraph: The (not actually) travel sized Guide
Offline 02-13-2015, 11:41 AM (This reply was last modified: 08-02-2016 02:24 PM by Glub.)(Edited by Glub.)
Reply: #1
How to Properly Paragraph: The (not actually) travel sized Guide
This isn’t a full guide by any means, but I’m aiming to make it one eventually! For now, it’s just a bunch of my ramblings, haha,,,,, 0/o//(\

[. BASICS .]

[. LENGTH .]
Often times, people come to me because of the sheer amount I'm able to pump out at times! I usually end up assuring them that no, I'm not practicing witchcraft, and giving them a few pointers on how to elaborate upon their characters.
I find that it helps a lot for you to write about your character's feelings, as well as their past experiences. Take this, for example!

Paying attention to detail usually, well, pays off! Describing things is a great way to make your posts longer, and it helps you as a writer as well. Finding synonyms for words such as "beautiful" or "suspicious" can be a bit of a scavenger hunt, but it's usually worth it in the end. It's a great idea to talk about the past, if it's a starter in a group chat that has a designated setting. This example that you see above was used in a reply to a Beforustuck rp, and you can probably see that I took time to talk about his past, his feelings, and the setting. I mean, I could've written more, but haha,, I doubt anybody would've wanted to read that much.
While long posts are usually vied after, it's not really recommended to drown everybody in a huge wall of text! It can be fun to type a lot, of course, but one must take in their surroundings as well. Ask yourself, for example, if other's replies are proportionate to yours. You wouldn't want to be pumping out, say... 11 messages when people are spouting one liners.
Write a lot, but practice moderation.


[. DETAIL .]
Resource(s) for this topic: 1
This one goes hand in hand with the previous section, due to the fact that detail plays a large part in how long a message can be. Like tip 11 in the first section said, it's always helpful to have a large vocabulary, and keeping a list of synonyms around doesn't hurt either. Using a website to find synonyms, can help this process along if you don't want to commit everything to memory. Try to avoid repeating phrases and the like, due to the fact that it takes away from your writing, and you should be good to go!
Now, for actually describing things.
Picturing things in your mind can make a world of a difference, and it's all touch typing from there. Imagine a shirt, or something equally as simple, for starters! What color is it? What's the texture, if your muse is touching it? If your muse is close to it, what would you imagine it to smell like? Going off on this topic, what detergent does your muse use? Stuff like that!
Practice doing this, and let your imagination fuel your writing as you go along. Drawing up metaphors and similes can be of aid, too. If you can't place it into words yourself, then simply compare it to something else!


[. SENTENCE STRUCTURE AND VARIATION .]
Everybody knows that there are different types of sentences, right? It's only a matter of utilizing all of them to their full effect during paragraph rping to make one's writing more enjoyable to read!
Sentence variation is pretty important, because you don't want your writing to sound completely uniform. Simple sentences are good for emphasizing certain things, while compound sentences (as well as those that are higher tiered than that) help carry the story along. Sentence variation in a post makes it sound a lot better and smoother, as well!


[. GODMODDING, POWERPLAYING, AND METAGAMING .]
Resource(s) for this topic: 1, 2
TL;DR? Basically, don't do it.
Godmodding is, in essence making your character out to be some sort of all powerful, omniscient being who can do everything. Dodge the ultimate attack of an all powerful character? Eeyup. A godmodder makes their character pretty much capable of doing everything, even if it's impossible. It's pretty annoying, honestly. To avoid becoming a godmodder, all you have to do is practice a bit of give and take! If you're fighting someone, dodge a few hits, but also take damage. Honestly? Just be realistic. If you can't dodge ten consecutive punches, the chances are that your character won't be able to, either.
Powerplaying is a branch of godmodding, where one takes control of someone else's character. Sound confusing? Sorry, I don't explain this quite well. An example would be if there was a Dave roleplaying with Dirk, and in their message, the Dirk roleplayer put "Dave reached over and held Dirk's hand," without first asking the mun of Dave. It's usually a careless mistake that's made, but it's becoming a serious issue in a lot of the chats that I run. Really, just be classy, and
Alex Vandic Wrote:Keep Your Strings to Yourself

Metagaming is another branch of godmodding, where one's character knows something that they really shouldn't. This is either because it was introduced in canon as character exclusive knowledge, or because a mun brought it up IC/OOC when the other's character was not present. This is usually a mistake, too, but mistakes shouldn't be repeated over and over without a reprimand. If a roleplayer mentions something about their character's dog dying in the past, do not use this information in your own post without first consulting the other person. Do not assume that your character will know everything, even if they are the other character's parent/family member. Practice common roleplay etiquette, and be sure to always, always ask another mun before trying to include information from their post in your own.


[. POINT OF VIEW .]
Resource(s) for this topic: 1
There are typically three points of view. One of them has two branches. First person point of view (POV) is the one that uses "I, me, my, myself, mine, our, we, etc" in narration; second person POV utilizes "you, your, etc" in narration; and third person POV uses "she, he, her, they, them, him, xir, etc" in narration. The lattermsot type has two sub branches, third person omniscient and third person limited. Third person omniscient has a narrator that knows what all the characters are feeling, which is usually not allowed. Third person limited is bound to one character, and the narrator is not privy to the thoughts of other characters. Most paragraph styled groups prefer third person narration over the other two, so keep that in mind!


[. SOUNDING MORE LIKE YOUR CHARACTER .]
Diction, or word choice, is a very essential part of a character's personality. There's a huge difference between saying that Rose got more curious about the situation when John didn't answer her, and that Rose's interest was significantly piqued when John avoided her question. You (hopefully) know how to roleplay your character, right? As golgothasTerror once said, taking a character's personality, but not their vocabulary is a common error among beginners. Try to refrain from this, since it plays a HUGE role if you're a predominantly paragraph roleplayer. By adapting your character's vocabulary and learning what words they use, you can sound much more in character when you type up replies and such! Take, for example, these two passages.
They're similar, right? They both revolve around the same topic/plot, but they sound somehow.. different. Excerpt B is different from Excerpt A, because I used words that Rose would find herself saying in the latter more than the former. Try to integrate your character's personality into the narration if possible-- ESPECIALLY if you type using second person or first.


[. TENSES .]
The 'tense' of a piece of writing is predominantly based on the 'tense' of the words used in it! Have you heard your English teacher talk about past, present, and future tense before? It's like that, but with a whole chunk of text instead of just one word.
Here're two examples! One with a singular tense, and one with two.
The first one seems to have more order, and a better flow, right?
Many people make the mistake of using both past and present tense in the same post, which can cause a few cringes if one were to look closely in a criticizing manner. Usually, it is most proper to stick to one tense per piece of writing, and to keep it that way for the rest of the rp unless you really can't/don't want to type in that tense any longer. In most cases, both rp-ers use the same tense in one on ones, but in situations where the tenses differ, it can get a bit hectic and confusing! It would be wise to talk things like this out with your partner beforehand, if you'd like to have a fluid paragraph rp between the two of you.

[Image: usDxVcS.png]
Find all replies by this user
Edit this reply Quote this message in a reply
Offline 02-13-2015, 12:27 PM
Reply: #2
RE: Paragraph RP Tips
This is pretty awesome :0! Thank you for posting.

[Image: PRo9SZp.png]
Visit this user's website Find all replies by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Offline 02-14-2015, 03:47 AM
Reply: #3
RE: Paragraph RP Tips
Thank you for posting this! This is extremely helpful.

asinineAnonymous
SpaceCat Extraordinaire
Find all replies by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Offline 02-14-2015, 05:59 PM
Reply: #4
RE: How to Properly Paragraph: The travel sized Guide [ WIP ]
I've added three more tips that I find helpful, so check this out again if you guys want!

[Image: usDxVcS.png]
Find all replies by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Offline 02-15-2015, 03:38 PM (This reply was last modified: 02-15-2015 03:38 PM by LostRefrain.)(Edited by LostRefrain.)
Reply: #5
RE: How to Properly Paragraph: The travel sized Guide [ WIP ]
this might be a bothersome comment, mostly asking for my own lame benefit, and possibly the less lame benefit of others, but might i suggest bolding your numbers? 1, 2, 3, ect, so they're easier to pick out? :0
sorry!

[Image: PRo9SZp.png]
Visit this user's website Find all replies by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Offline 02-15-2015, 03:52 PM
Reply: #6
RE: How to Properly Paragraph: The travel sized Guide [ WIP ]
(02-15-2015 03:38 PM)LostRefrain Wrote:  this might be a bothersome comment, mostly asking for my own lame benefit, and possibly the less lame benefit of others, but might i suggest bolding your numbers? 1, 2, 3, ect, so they're easier to pick out? :0
sorry!

It has been done friendo. That didn't even occur to me to be honest, thanks for suggesting it! Man, it really does look easier to read now. *Paps you because hot damn you are a genius or something*

[Image: usDxVcS.png]
Find all replies by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Offline 02-15-2015, 04:25 PM
Reply: #7
RE: How to Properly Paragraph: The travel sized Guide [ WIP ]
psh, thank you kindly friend c:

[Image: PRo9SZp.png]
Visit this user's website Find all replies by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Offline 09-21-2015, 06:21 PM
Reply: #8
RE: How to Properly Paragraph: The travel sized Guide
Bumping because relevant in conversation.

i am a lump of coal in your stocking

(04-11-2015 01:57 AM)inexplicablyGhastly Wrote:  Slow down there, Satan. That's enough feels for the day.

Kinks: character development, angst, feels

Pronouns: she/her
Find all replies by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Offline 09-22-2015, 06:45 PM (This reply was last modified: 09-23-2015 01:49 AM by lonelyDreamer.)(Edited by lonelyDreamer.)
Reply: #9
RE: How to Properly Paragraph: The (not actually) travel sized Guide
Bumping; conversation again.

i am a lump of coal in your stocking

(04-11-2015 01:57 AM)inexplicablyGhastly Wrote:  Slow down there, Satan. That's enough feels for the day.

Kinks: character development, angst, feels

Pronouns: she/her
Find all replies by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Offline 09-23-2015, 01:40 AM
Reply: #10
RE: How to Properly Paragraph: The (not actually) travel sized Guide
>:U I actually enjoyed this guide, despite my disgruntled face. I'm digging the Hemingway tool, the rest of this is also really solid advice. I needed a boost like this.

[Image: PML1RdN.gif]
Find all replies by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Board jump:


User(s) browsing this memo: 1 Guest(s)